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Waste and recycling operations in Pittsburg will get costlier and a lot bigger following approvals by the City Council this week.

In response to new state-mandated environmental regulations on the handling of organic waste, Contra Costa Waste Services sought and was given an increase of $16.25 per ton for the costs associated with the infrastructure, equipment and processing to be spread over three years at $5.42/ton per year.

The business also was granted a Consumer Price Index increase of 1.6 percent for 2021, and the city manager authorized additional annual CPI adjustments of up to 4 percent for 2022 and 2023.

The company was also authorized to charge a mixed waste rate of $120 per ton beginning Jan. 1, 2022.

The rate increases passed in a 5-0 vote by the council Monday.

The council also endorsed plans for a massive expansion of the Mt. Diablo Recovery Resource Center at 1300 Loveridge Road. The 36-acre waste processing site is currently approved for handling 1,500 tons per day.

The Mt. Diablo Recovery Resource Center on Loveridge Road in Pittsburg appears in an undated aerial photo. (Google image)

New state environmental regulations will require the processing of organic waste to be brought indoors. To accomplish this and other objectives, the firm proposed construction of 11 new buildings totaling 505,600 square feet over a 10-year period.

The ultimate buildout will raise the processing of waste at the site from 1,500 tons per day to about 5,500 tons per day, including all the added truck traffic it would produce.

No public comments were made on the project at Monday night’s public meeting. Sal Evola, a former city mayor, now the environmental and regulatory director of Mt. Diablo Resource Recovery, fielded council questions. Jordan Davis, the city director of community development, noted Tuesday that the firm “harnessed their community outreach” in getting local support.

The council voted 5-0 to move the project forward. A final vote on the development agreement will likely be taken at the Oct. 4 council meeting, Davis said.