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Danville is appealing its latest regional housing needs allocation (RHND) from the Association of Bay Area Governments, saying the 2,241 units it needs to create from 2023 to 2031 should have been calculated on prioritizing housing near job centers, rather than “high resource centers.”

The town said in a news release, “the appeal focuses on the methodology used by (ABAG) to generate that housing number.” It said the town is joining other municipalities in the county to protest the methodology.

Since 1969, the state has required each local government to plan to create its share of housing for people of all incomes. ABAG — made up of officials from all over the Bay Area’s nine counties — determines the method of calculation, then assigns each municipality its numbers.

According to the ABAG website, the state requires five key objectives to be met:

• Increasing housing supply and mix of housing types, with the goal of improving affordability of equity within the region.

• Promoting in-fill development and socioeconomic equity while protecting environmental and agricultural resources.

• Improving the intra-regional jobs-to-housing relationship, including the balance between low-wage jobs and affordable housing.

• Balancing disproportionate household income distribution, with more high-income allocation to lower-income areas and vice versa.

• Affirmatively further fair housing.

The California Housing and Community Development Department gave ABAG its next RHND projections in June 2020. During the next eight-year cycle, the Bay Area needs to provide 441,176 new units of housing from 2023 to 2031.

Of that, 25.9 percent (114,442 units) needs to be for very low-income residents; 14.9 percent (65,892) needs to be for low-income residents; 16.5 percent (72,712 units) needs to target moderate income residents; and 42.6 percent (188,130 units) needs to be for residents with above-moderate income.

Each municipality’s allocation was determined in 2020 by surveys of Bay Area communities, including information based on jurisdictions’ fair housing issues, strategies, and actions for achieving fair housing goals.

Each jurisdiction is required to update housing elements to identify land, policies, and programs meant to accommodate its housing targets.

Danville filed its appeal July 9. The town is hosting a housing workshop at 6 p.m. Aug. 19. Those interested in attending can register online. Questions about the process can be submitted via email.