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San Francisco’s famed Coit Tower, part of the city’s iconic skyline, reopened this week, welcoming visitors for the first time in 15 months.

The 210-foot-tall tower boasts 26 murals inside, each depicting Depression-era life. Prior to the pandemic, it hosted some 1,500 visitors daily.

“From its panoramic views to the Depression-era frescoes painted on its walls, Coit Tower gives visitors a glimpse of the city’s breathtaking beauty and the resilience of its residents,” Mayor London Breed said in a statement.

“Coit Tower is a special place — not just for tourists but locals who want to see their city in a new and awe-inspiring way.”

Phil Ginsburg, San Francisco Recreation and Park Department

“Coit Tower is a special place — not just for tourists but locals who want to see their city in a new and awe-inspiring way. We’re grateful to be able to provide this experience to visitors again,” said Phil Ginsburg, general manager of the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department, the agency tasked with maintaining the city’s parks.

Under the new guidelines, visitors at Coit Tower will be required to wear masks in the elevator and guided tours of the artwork will be limited to six people at a time, city officials said.

Coit Tower was first built in 1933, with funds left to the city by famed socialite Lillie Hitchcock Coit, who was known as a patron of the city’s firefighters. The funds were also used to build the Volunteer Firemen Memorial sculpture in Washington Square Park.

More information, including how to buy tickets, can be found on the park department’s website.