San Francisco Supervisor Matt Haney wants his city to do a better job of keeping its streets clean. (Photo courtesy of San Francisco Public Works)

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San Francisco Supervisor Matt Haney is calling on the city to address trash and filth on the streets — something that he says has put San Francisco under an international spotlight.

Haney announced he is planning a hearing at the Board of Supervisors that will ask the city’s Department of Public Works, as well as the private company Recology that provides trash service in San Francisco, to shed light on the issue and figure out a plan to address garbage on the streets.

The cleanliness of San Francisco streets has long been a topic of discussion among national and international media, as well as city officials and residents who complain about trash, feces and needles on downtown streets.

“People of my district deserve clean and healthy streets and sidewalks just like everyone else. Everyone in San Francisco deserves that, and what the city is doing now is not working to deliver it,” Haney said in a statement.

“In my district it is not uncommon to walk block after block, in some of our busiest, most densely populated areas, without seeing a single trash can. How do we expect people to clean up after themselves if we don’t even give them the opportunity?” he said.

“Blaming the people of the Tenderloin and SOMA as though they are at fault for all of the trash that is on our streets when the city is failing to fulfill the basic duty of providing an appropriate number of trash cans and street cleaning is unacceptable. We must come up with a plan to address the issue, which is having a very real impact on the quality of life for the residents and businesses of our city,” he said.

Haney suggests that the city buy about 60 stronger solar-powered garbage bins and place them throughout the Tenderloin and South of Market neighborhoods.

He’s also suggesting the city place more effective locks on bins or that it arrange for bins to be picked up behind locked gates or garages.

Haney said a recent pilot program by Recology where residents signed up for indoor garbage pickups helped mitigate street trash on Ellis Street. He is suggesting Recology expand the program.

In addition to a hearing, Haney is also calling on the city’s Legislative Analyst’s Office to report on the costs of implementing his suggestions.

Haney’s office estimates the hearing will likely happen at the supervisors’ Public Safety and Neighborhood Services Committee sometime in December.